Research Ideas  

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Welcome to IBD Partners Research Ideas Page!

In this area you will be able to:

  • Propose, vote on, and discuss research ideas
  • View current studies
  • View published research

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You are an active participant in  IBD Partners research prioritization process! Have you ever had a question about IBD that you wish science could answer? Tell us what research is important to you!

Here, you can submit a research idea to the community, cast your votes, and discuss research ideas proposed by other members. Please make your research question as specific as possible. Other members will vote on your research idea, and we will prioritize research ideas with the most votes.

You are allowed to vote for your own proposed research idea if you want. However, you can only vote for a total of five research ideas. If you have already cast your five votes and an idea you like even more is proposed, you can change your votes at any time to reflect your current preferences.

The research team will review all submitted ideas and provide a response to you and to the community. If your idea leads to an IBD Partners Study, you will have the opportunity to serve as a patient collaborator on the research team for that study.

We encourage you to prioritize the ideas that are most important to you, even if the research team determines that your idea is not a good fit for IBD Partners. We will share ideas labeled “Not a Good Fit” with researchers outside of our network when appropriate. We want to make sure all of your votes count!

Thanks for your participation in this important platform to help the IBD research community understand what research questions are important to patients. We are passionate about finding answers to your questions!

Published Studies

Year Publication Categories
2014
Prevalence of a Gluten-free Diet and Improvement of Clinical Symptoms in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Summary

Patients with celiac disease (an autoimmune disorder where eating gluten can damage the small intestine) benefit from a gluten free diet (GFD). Few data are available to tell us if patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) may also benefit from this diet. Individuals with GI symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue and nausea can have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, for which a GFD can be beneficial. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity can also co-exist with IBD. We therefore asked patients enrolled in CCFA Partners whether they have ever tried a gluten free diet (GFD), whether they followed this diet closely, and whether it helped with any symptoms. A total of 1647 people took the survey on GFD. A total of 314 (19.1%) reported that they had ever tried a GFD and 135 (8.1%) were currently following the diet. Overall, 206/314 (65.6%) trying a GFD reported improvement in any GI symptom while on this diet. Over a 1/3 of people (38.3%) felt that they experienced fewer or less severe flares while on the diet. Improvements in clinical symptoms were reported for bloating (56.5%), diarrhea (42.6%), abdominal pain (41.5%), fatigue (27.5%), and nausea (26.3%) while on a GFD. Fatigue was significantly improved with excellent adherence to the diet. Because many patients had improved symptoms on the GFD, it is possible that patients with IBD could suffer from non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Fewer people who felt better on a GFD were taking biologics medications, suggesting that flare symptoms in those with more severe disease may not respond to a GFD. Future studies are needed to understand the benefits of this diet in IBD patients, and the mechanism of improvement with this dietary intervention.


Full Published Manuscript

Keywords
Gluten Free Diet; GFD; flare; active disease; risk; prevention

Diet, Lifestyle, Alternative Therapies, Health Maintenance
2013
Behavioral Strategies to Improve Cohort Retention within CCFA Partners

Summary

Earlier studies have shown that people who participate in surveys (such as CCFA Partners) may respond better to survey requests if these have a time limit (such as telling participants that surveys need to be done in 72 hours). This is called "scarcity." Other ways to improve survey response include messages targeting: paying it forward (that what you are doing will help people in the future), guilt, altruism (helping others), and self-serving (helping yourself). Our goal was to see if scarcity or these messages improved response rates within CCFA Partners. The scarcity group received a 'warning' email informing them that they will be sent a survey link the next day, and that they will have 72 hours to complete the survey. The control group received no warning email. We also tested the four different messages described above and a "control" message that just informed patients that it was time for their survey. We sent emails to a total of 8697 people within CCFA Partners asking them to complete their follow-up surveys. Of these, 2965 started their follow up survey. There was no difference between those in the 'scarcity group' as compared to control group. Scarcity was, however, more effective in the >50 age group. Of the messages, guilt resulted in a significantly higher response rate, while the other messages were no different than control. In summary, behavioral interventions applied to an internet-based IBD cohort have little benefit in improving response rates. Guilt had the strongest effect. The reasons that the other messages did not work may be that these interventions don't apply in an IBD population, that e-mail messages are not as effective, or that members of CCFA Partners are already very motivated to fill out surveys.


Full Scientific Abstract

Keywords
cohort; response; retention; community; population; behavioral strategies; behavior

Research Methods, Study Updates
2012
A Randomized Trial of Electronic (E-mail) Educational Prevention Messages within the CCFA Partners Cohort

Summary

It is recommended that patients with inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, get an influenza, or "flu" vaccine every year. The flu vaccine is especially important for patients taking medication to suppress their immune system. This study showed that 1 in 3 IBD patients did not get a flu vaccine in 2011. Receiving an email reminder from the CCFA Partners program did not make patients more likely to get a flu vaccine.


Full Scientific Abstract

Keywords
education; preventive interventions; prevention; intervention; community; population; outreach

Research Methods, Study Updates
2012
An Update on the CCFA Partners Internet Cohort Study

Summary

As of August 2012, nearly 12000 patients have enrolled in CCFA Partners, and about half completed at least one follow-up study, which are released every 6 months. The CCFA Partners project currently includes 9 additional studies from external investigators. Two validation studies and a DNA collection pilot project are also underway.


Full Scientific Abstract

Keywords
cohort; education; preventive intervention; prevention; intervention; community; population; outreach; resource

Research Methods, Study Updates
2011
Status of Prevention in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases within the CCFA Partners Cohort

Summary

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, may be more likely to develop weak bones, infections like influenza and tuberculosis and certain cancers of the skin, cervix and colon, depending on the type of medications they use. Fortunately, there are simple activities that can prevent these from occurring. In a survey of over 7000 patients with IBD, only about half had a bone density scan or took calcium or vitamin D supplements to promote bone health. Only 40% reported having a skin exam and 16% reported always wearing sunscreen to prevent skin cancer. Less than two thirds had an influenza (flu) vaccine. These results show that not enough patients are doing simple activities to prevent weak bones, infections and cancers that may be related to IBD.


Full Scientific Abstract

Keywords
preventive; care; active disease; flare; prevention; risk; educational interventions; intervention; education; outreach; community; population

Research Methods, Health Maintenance
2011
Medication Adherence in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases within the CCFA Partners Cohort

Summary

In a survey of over 7000 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, more than half of all patients got a low score on medication adherence questions, which means that most patients are not taking their IBD medications correctly all of the time. In general, people felt better when they had a high medication adherence score. The researchers recommend educating patients to improve medication adherence.


Full Scientific Abstract

Keywords
relapse prevention; relapse; prevention; preventive; drugs; medication; adherence; compliance, educational interventions; education; outreach; community; population

Medications, Lifestyle

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