Research Ideas  

×
Welcome to IBD Partners Research Ideas Page!

In this area you will be able to:

  • Propose, vote on, and discuss research ideas
  • View current studies
  • View published research

Show More

You are an active participant in  IBD Partners research prioritization process! Have you ever had a question about IBD that you wish science could answer? Tell us what research is important to you!

Here, you can submit a research idea to the community, cast your votes, and discuss research ideas proposed by other members. Please make your research question as specific as possible. Other members will vote on your research idea, and we will prioritize research ideas with the most votes.

You are allowed to vote for your own proposed research idea if you want. However, you can only vote for a total of five research ideas. If you have already cast your five votes and an idea you like even more is proposed, you can change your votes at any time to reflect your current preferences.

The research team will review all submitted ideas and provide a response to you and to the community. If your idea leads to an IBD Partners Study, you will have the opportunity to serve as a patient collaborator on the research team for that study.

We encourage you to prioritize the ideas that are most important to you, even if the research team determines that your idea is not a good fit for IBD Partners. We will share ideas labeled “Not a Good Fit” with researchers outside of our network when appropriate. We want to make sure all of your votes count!

Thanks for your participation in this important platform to help the IBD research community understand what research questions are important to patients. We are passionate about finding answers to your questions!

Published Studies

Year Publication Categories
2019
Diet Low in Red and Processed Meat Does Not Reduce Rate of Crohn’s Disease Flares

Summary

Diet may be an important factor in the development and progression of IBD. A previous study demonstrated that patients with ulcerative colitis were more likely to flare with increased consumption of red and processed meats. We sought to examine whether increased consumption of red and processed meats was associated with Crohn's disease (CD) flares. To do this, adults with CD were recruited from IBD Partners. Patients who were in remission were randomly assigned to groups that consumed a minimum of 2 servings/week of red or processed meat (118 patients) or not more than 1 serving per month (96 patients) for 49 weeks. The primar y outcome was relapse of CD, defined as increase in short Crohn's Disease Activity Index or a need for surgery or a need for new medication. During the trial, patients in the high-meat group reported compliance with eating 2 or more servings of red or processed meat during 98.5% of weeks compared to 18.8% of weeks for the low-meat group. In an analysis of data from the FACES trial, we found that among patients with CD in remission, amount of red and processed meat consumption was not associated with risk of flare.


Full Scientific Manuscript

Keywords
diet; red meat; processed meat; Crohn's disease; CD; Flares

Lifestyle, Health Maintenance
2019
A Novel Patient-Reported Outcome-Based Evaluation (PROBE) of Quality of Life in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Summary

In this study, researchers were interested in creating a new, shorter survey to measure health related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with IBD. To do this, they came up with new patient-reported survey questions and compared them to questions already being used. They were able to create a shorter, 6-question survey known as the PROBE that measures HRQOL just as well as longer instruments. The researchers believe that this shorter survey will make it easier to assess HRQOL among patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis when providers treat patients in the clinic, and when IBD is eva luated in future research studies.


Full Scientific Manuscript

Keywords
quality of life

Lifestyle
2018
High Patient Activation Is Associated With Remission in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Summary

Research has shown that patients with chronic diseases have better health outcomes if they are knowledgeable, skilled and confident in managing their disease. In this study, researchers wanted to find out if this is true for patients with IBD. To evaluate this, they delivered a survey called the Patient Activation Measure to 1,486 patients with IBD. Based on this survey, patients are placed on one of four levels. The lowest level is Level 1, “disengaged and overwhelmed.” The highest level is Level 4, “maintaining behaviors and pushing further.” Follow-up data available for 1082 survey participants (73%) showed that patients with high activation (levels 3 or 4) were more likely than those with low activation (levels 1 or 2) to be in clinical remission 6-12 months after the initial survey assessment.


Full Scientific Manuscript

Keywords
patient activation; PAM; Patient Activation Measure; surgery; Crohn’s disease; CD; ulcerative colitis; UC; remission

Lifestyle, Health Maintenance
2016
Association Between Affective-Cognitive Symptoms of Depression and Exacerbation of Crohn's Disease

Summary

Depression is common among patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). In this study, we wanted to understand if CD patients in remission who reported symptoms of depression were more likely to experience worsened CD symptoms later in time. To answer this question we looked at responses to CCFA Partners survey questions submitted by more than 2,000 CD patients about negative mood (I felt depressed), negative beliefs about the self (I felt worthless, I felt hopeless), and decreased life engagement/negativity (I felt hopeless) during the past seven days. Twelve months later, we asked about the severity of their CD activity using a standard CD questionnaire about diarrhea, pain, and well-being. We found that symptoms of depression predicted CD activity a year later. In other words, CD patients who were depressed were more likely to have CD symptoms a year later than those who were not depressed.


Full Published Manuscript

Keywords
depression; comorbidity; Crohn’s disease; Crohn’s; CD

Lifestyle, Mental Health
2015
Avoidance of Fiber is Associated with Greater Risk of Crohn's Disease Flare in a 6 Month Period

Summary

Dietary fiber is found in plant foods such as fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Past studies found that dietary fiber can affect bacterial colonies in your stomach and intestines. However, there is limited information about how dietary fiber affects inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) symptoms. In this study, we looked at fiber consumption and whether it was associated with flares in adults with IBD. A total of 1619 participants in CCFA Partners completed a diet survey and a follow-up survey 6 months later. We found that participants with Crohn’s disease who reported eating the most fiber were less likely to have a flare within a 6 month period. In addition, participants with Crohn’s disease who told us they did not avoid high fiber foods were about 40% less likely to have a flare than participants who told us they avoid high fiber foods. Interestingly, we did not find an association between fiber consumption and disease flares among participants with ulcerative colitis. In summary, eating foods high in fiber may help reduce risk of flares among patients with Crohn’s disease.


Full Published Manuscript

Keywords
active disease; fiber; flare; prevention; risk; Crohn’s disease; Crohn’s; CD

Diet, Alternative Therapies, Lifestyle, Health Maintenance
2015
Exercise Decreases Risk of Future Active Disease in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission

Summary

Little is known about how exercise impacts disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study explored the relationship between exercise level and disease activity in a large group of patients with IBD in remission. A total of 1,857 patients from the CCFA Partners cohort participated by answering online questions about their exercise level and disease activity at the beginning of the study (in remission) and then again after six-months. We found that participants with Crohn’s disease who reported higher levels of exercise at the beginning of the study were significantly less likely to report active disease six-months later. We also found this association among participants with ulcerative colitis (UC) and indeterminate colitis (IC), but the results were not significant. Results of this study suggest that for patients with Crohn’s disease (and possibly for patients with UC and IC) who are in remission, higher levels of exercise may reduce the risk of developing active disease in the short-term.


Full Published Manuscript

Keywords
active disease; flare; prevention; risk

Exercise, Lifestyle, Alternative Therapies, Health Maintenance
2013
Sleep Disturbance and Risk of Active Disease in Patients With Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Summary

People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, tend to have poor quality of sleep. In this study of over 3000 people with IBD, those with more disease activity, depression, female gender, a history of smoking, or those currently taking corticosteroids or narcotics were more likely to have sleep disturbance. Of people with Crohn's disease who were in remission at the beginning of the study, those with sleep disturbance were twice as likely to have a flare in 6 months. No effect was seen for ulcerative colitis. These results suggest that sleep is important for maintaining remission in IBD.


Full Published Manuscript

Keywords
active disease; sleep; flare; risk; prevention; Crohn’s Disease; Crohn's; CD; Ulcerative Colitis; UC; colitis

Lifestyle

Active Studies VIEW ALL
Your search did not match any active studies.