Research Ideas  

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Welcome to IBD Partners Research Ideas Page!

In this area you will be able to:

  • Propose, vote on, and discuss research ideas
  • View current studies
  • View published research

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You are an active participant in  IBD Partners research prioritization process! Have you ever had a question about IBD that you wish science could answer? Tell us what research is important to you!

Here, you can submit a research idea to the community, cast your votes, and discuss research ideas proposed by other members. Please make your research question as specific as possible. Other members will vote on your research idea, and we will prioritize research ideas with the most votes.

You are allowed to vote for your own proposed research idea if you want. However, you can only vote for a total of five research ideas. If you have already cast your five votes and an idea you like even more is proposed, you can change your votes at any time to reflect your current preferences.

The research team will review all submitted ideas and provide a response to you and to the community. If your idea leads to an IBD Partners Study, you will have the opportunity to serve as a patient collaborator on the research team for that study.

We encourage you to prioritize the ideas that are most important to you, even if the research team determines that your idea is not a good fit for IBD Partners. We will share ideas labeled “Not a Good Fit” with researchers outside of our network when appropriate. We want to make sure all of your votes count!

Thanks for your participation in this important platform to help the IBD research community understand what research questions are important to patients. We are passionate about finding answers to your questions!

What is the effect of hormones, particularly increased estrogen, on Crohn's disease.

The common statement is that 1/3 of Crohn's patients feel better or go into remission during pregnancy. Why? Is there a way to be able to replicate the "pregnancy effect" when patients are not pregnant.

Women's Health
last activity about 2 months ago
62    8

How can we help couples make more informed decisions regarding medication usage during pregnancy and nursing? Most biologics have not even had animal studies conducted.

Making healthy decisions about the health of one's unborn child is one of the most important responsibilities of a parent. Any help the medical community can give would help with better outcomes for babies and mothers in addition to easing pre-pregnancy anxieties.

Women's Health
last activity 4 months ago
4    2
Proposed Idea              

Why some women with Crohn's Disease achieve remission, during the second and third trimester of pregnancy, then flare months after giving birth.

Because, it happened to me with both of my.pregnancies. During my first trimester, I had to be hospitalized with partial obstruction. After that, I was healthier than I'd been in years, until a few months after giving birth.

Women's Health
last activity almost 2 years ago
1    1

We should research how pregnancy causes/impacts UC and Crohn's.

to help women make more informed decisions regarding pregnancy

Women's Health
last activity almost 3 years ago
3    1
Proposed Idea              

What link is there between nutritional deficiencies in pregnant women with IBD and their children's health: dental cavities at young age, ADHD, etc?

Women's Health
last activity about 3 years ago
1    0

Propose Research Idea


Published Studies VIEW ALL
Paternal Disease Activity Is Associated With Difficulty in Conception Among Men With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

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Infertility Care Among Men and Women With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in the CCFA Partners Cohort

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Symptom Worsening During Pregnancy and Lactation is Associated with Age, Body Mass Index, and Disease Phenotype in Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Read Study

Active Studies VIEW ALL
OTIS Autoimmune Diseases In Pregnancy Study

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