Research Ideas  

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Welcome to IBD Partners Research Ideas Page!

In this area you will be able to:

  • Propose, vote on, and discuss research ideas
  • View current studies
  • View published research

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You are an active participant in  IBD Partners research prioritization process! Have you ever had a question about IBD that you wish science could answer? Tell us what research is important to you!

Here, you can submit a research idea to the community, cast your votes, and discuss research ideas proposed by other members. Please make your research question as specific as possible. Other members will vote on your research idea, and we will prioritize research ideas with the most votes.

You are allowed to vote for your own proposed research idea if you want. However, you can only vote for a total of five research ideas. If you have already cast your five votes and an idea you like even more is proposed, you can change your votes at any time to reflect your current preferences.

The research team will review all submitted ideas and provide a response to you and to the community. If your idea leads to an IBD Partners Study, you will have the opportunity to serve as a patient collaborator on the research team for that study.

We encourage you to prioritize the ideas that are most important to you, even if the research team determines that your idea is not a good fit for IBD Partners. We will share ideas labeled “Not a Good Fit” with researchers outside of our network when appropriate. We want to make sure all of your votes count!

Thanks for your participation in this important platform to help the IBD research community understand what research questions are important to patients. We are passionate about finding answers to your questions!

We should compare individuals who manage their disease with medication and those who manage their disease with popular diets in the IBD community, such as SCD, FODMAPS, paleo, etc.

One of the great questions in the IBD community is, understandably, about food. Some people are able to manage their disease with with diet alone, but many take medication. So, what's the difference? Why do particular meds work for some, and particular diets work for others? I propose comparing individuals who manage their condition with diet vs. those who manage their condition with medication, with the goal of figuring out whether it's genetics, the microbiome, or some other factor that makes a particular strategy effective for an individual. Ideally the "diet" and "med" groups would be as similar as possible (same disease in same location, similar initial clinical courses, same objective markers of inflammation, etc), and we'd want two groups of patients who have disease objectively "under control." This could impact every patient with IBD and better guide treatment decisions.

Diet
last activity 3 months ago
140    16

Create a database that tracks the long-term outcomes for patients on biologic medications (Remicade, Humira, Cimzia, Simponi, Tysabri, and Entyvio) to assess their long-term efficacy.

As IBD research and treatments progress, biologics are becoming an ever-more staple part of a patients treatment regimen. However, many patients still fail to respond effectively to these medications while others can maintain long-term remission specifically because of them. I believe it is important for the IBD community to further explore why this variation in response occurs, and tracking those that respond effectively to these biologic drugs can, perhaps, help us to better understand why some respond while others do not.

Medications
last activity 5 months ago
36    2

Comorbidities of Neurological conditions and IBD

Recent data (Kigerl et al. 2016 (JEM), Bourassa et al. (Neuroscience Letters) and others) have suggested that dysbiosis in the gut, similar to that observed in IBD can affect both recovery following neurological injury and general neurological health. Examining reported levels of comorbidity could provide insights into whether further study of these relationships is warranted. This would, hopefully, lead to better outcomes for both neurology and IBD patients.

Other
last activity 3 months ago
5    3

What is the effect of endurance training and or general exercise on our disease activity/ disease path?

Finding ways to manage stress is arguably a generally good health process, so wouldnt that mean doing so for chronic disease is important? but is more, more or does it potentially harm when exceeding a certain level?

Lifestyle
last activity 3 months ago
19    2

How safe is it for IBD patients to become pregnant? How do medications affect the child, and what steps should the parents take before deciding to conceive?

There is very little research available to patients on the effects of IBD medication on unborn children. Many patients are left trying to weigh the risks themselves, without a complete understanding of the long-term effects.

Women's Health
last activity 3 months ago
17    3
Studied              

Research the validity of VSL#3 probiotic in controlling flare ups or as a factor in remission.

I tried this as a last resort 3years ago during a very serious flare up of UC and it not only put me in remission but I have not felt this healthy in over 9 years!! Have been thru many stressful situations since being in remission and absolutely no symptoms of a flare up!!!!

Diet
last activity 4 months ago
99    7

What is the role of stress and the stress response in autoimmunity?

Anyone with a disease can tell you that high stress environments make symptoms worse and relaxation techniques often help. It has also been shown, primarily in animal studies, that "stress hormones" like cortisol or changes at in epigenes have severe repercussions across the body. Can managing these help control symptoms or remission?

Lifestyle
last activity 3 months ago
55    4

What is the effect of hormones, particularly increased estrogen, on Crohn's disease.

The common statement is that 1/3 of Crohn's patients feel better or go into remission during pregnancy. Why? Is there a way to be able to replicate the "pregnancy effect" when patients are not pregnant.

Women's Health
last activity 3 months ago
62    8

The use of Cannabis as treatment for Crohn's Disease symptoms.

The use of Cannabis for CD symptoms should be highly considered. We are constantly using drugs to manage our symptoms but with the use of those drugs can come serious side effects. If you are someone like myself who suffers from extreme nausea waking up in the morning and attempting to keep a pill down is in a word, impossible. You can't keep the medication down long enough for it to take any actual effect but taking a couple deep breaths to calm yourself and take your Cannabis is a much quicker, easier solution that improves nausea instantly. Research has shown the CBD in Cannabis is linked to incredible anti-inflammatory, pain relieving, anti-nausea, anti-anxiety, and muscle relaxing properties. This would be extremely beneficial to us CD suffers since our disease revolves around inflammation. Cannabis when used properly is a easier, safer, more effective way to relieve CD symptoms.

Alternative Therapies
last activity about 1 month ago
14    4

Propose Research Idea


Published Studies VIEW ALL
Diet Low in Red and Processed Meat Does Not Reduce Rate of Crohn’s Disease Flares

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Impact of Obesity on Disease Activity andPatient-Reported Outcomes Measurement InformationSystem (PROMIS) in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

Read Study
A Novel Patient-Reported Outcome-Based Evaluation (PROBE) of Quality of Life in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Read Study

Active Studies VIEW ALL
The Effects of Antidepressant Medication and Social Support on Disease Progression in IBD Patients

Read Study
Symptom Clusters in Adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Read Study
Psychological Factors Associated with Adherence to Oral Treatment in IBD

Read Study

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